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Adding makandra-rubocop to an existing code base

Introduction

Most of the time it is a tedious task to apply a code style guide to an existing code base as there are likely to be a lot of conflicts. At makandra we are using makandra-rubocop to have code style checks. Here is some advice on how to add makandra-rubocop efficiently.

Apply Cops separately

If you want to review each correction, it is easier to run each Cop separately. This way you know what kind of change to expect and don't have to find …

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Capistrano: How to find out which version of your application is currently live

When deploying, Capistrano puts a REVISION file into your application's release directory. It contains the hash of the commit which was deployed.

If you want to know the currently deployed release, simply SSH to a server and view that file.

$ cat /var/www/my-project/current/REVISION
cf8734ece3938fc67262ad5e0d4336f820689307

Capistrano task

When your application is deployed to multiple servers, you probably want to see a result for all of them.
Here is a Capistrano task that checks all servers with the :app role.

```rub…

Bash script to list commits by Pivotal Tracker ID

The main benefit of our convention to prefix commits by their corresponding Pivotal Tracker ID is that we can easily detect commits that belong to the same story. You can either do that manually or use the bash script below by copying it somewhere to your .bashrc.

```bash
# Usage: ptcommits '#123456'
function ptcommits {
if test "$1"
then
git log –oneline | grep "$1" | grep "^[a-z0-9]*" -o | xargs –no-run-i…

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A community-curated list of flexbox issues and cross-browser workarounds for them

This repository is a community-curated list of flexbox issues and cross-browser workarounds for them. The goal is that if you're building a website using flexbox and something isn't working as you'd expect, you can find the solution here.

As the spec continues to evolve and vendors nail down their implementations, this repo will be updated with newly discovered issues and remove old issues as they're fixed or become obsolete. If you discover a bug that's not listed here, please report it so everyone else can benefit.

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How to: Use git bisect to find bugs and regressions

Git allows you to do a binary search across commits to hunt down the commit that introduced a bug.

Given you are currently on your branch's HEAD that is not working as expected, an example workflow could be:

git bisect start # Start bisecting
git bisect bad # Tag the revision you are currently on (HEAD) as bad. You could also pass a commit's SHA1 like below:
git bisect good abcdef12345678 # Give the SHA1 of any commit that was working as it should
# shorthand:
git bisect start <bad ref> <good ref>

Git will fetch a comm…

Capistrano: Finding out who deployed which revision of your application and when

Capistrano automatically logs each (successful) deployment into a file on your application servers.

It is located at the root of your server's project folder, i.e. the parent of releases and current, like so:

/var/www/your-project$ ls
current
log
releases
repo
revisions.log  <---  here
shared

Each line in that file contains the deployed branch, commit, release ID, and username (was read from the deploying user's machine):

```
$ tail -n3 revisions.log
Branch master (at da45511bea63002ac2ff002d1692e09d0dd7cb88) deployed as rel…

Restore changes, even from deleted files, with RubyMines "Local History"-Feature

Sometimes, due to git or other "accidents", important files get deleted or overwritten.

At a state when even Ctrl+Z doesn't work anymore, you maybe can rescue your files with RubyMines "Local History"-Feature!

To do this try the following:

  • If the file got deleted, recreate a new empty file with the same name on the exact same place
  • Open that file in the editor
  • Go to RubyMine and click on VCS -> Local History -> Show History
  • In the now open window, you should see all greater changes made to the File, even before it got deleted/temp…
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Webpack(er): A primer

webpack is a very powerful asset bundler written in node.js to bundle (ES6) JavaScript modules, stylesheets, images, and other assets for consumption in browsers.

Webpacker is a wrapper around webpack that handles integration with Rails.

This is a short introduction.

Installation

If you haven't already, you need to install node.js and Yarn.

Then, put

```ruby
gem 'webpacker', '~> 4.x' # check if 4.x is still cu…

Git: Apply a diff

git apply allows you to apply a diff onto your HEAD. Most often you can achieve the same result with a rebase & merge.

Example:

master                commit1 - commit3
feature-branch                \ commit2 - commit4
git checkout feature-branch
git reset --hard commit3
git diff ..commit4 | git apply
master                commit1 - commit3
feature-branch                          \ Unstaged commit 2 & 4

You can also [create a patch and apply it afterwards](https://makandracards.com/makandra/2521-git-how-to…

Yarn: How to recognize that you are using a different node version than your colleagues

The issue in this card can occur if the node_modules directory is checked into your Git repository. We usually recommend to exclude node_modules from version control.

In any case you should document which version of node to use in your project in a .nvmrc file.


I saw a strange behaviour after we introduced webpack in one of our projects and finally found out the reason: The person who committed the files used a node version that is older than mine.

Every time I wanted to run my rai…

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Howto: Write a proper git commit message

Seven Rules

  1. Separate subject from body with a blank line
  2. Limit the subject line to 50 characters (max. 72)
  3. Capitalize the subject line
  4. Do not end the subject line with a period
  5. Use the imperative mood in the subject line
  6. Wrap the body at 72 characters
  7. Use the body to explain what and why vs. how

5. Use the imperative mood in the subject line (partially extracted)

If applied, this commit will your subject line here

Good:

  • If applied, this commit will refactor subsystem X for readability
  • If applie…
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Git: Show commits that have touched specific text in a file

If you want to find the commits that touched a specific text in a file, use git log -S 'text in the code' -- path/to/file.


Here is an example, where the move of the convert_number_column_value(value) method in active record is traced (simplified output):

git log -n 1 --pretty=oneline -S 'convert_number_column_value(value)' -- activerecord/lib/active_record/base.rb
ceb33f84933639d3b61aac62e5e71fd087ab65ed Split out most of the AR::Base code into separate modules :cake:

```
git show ceb33f84933639d3b61aac62e5e71fd087ab65ed…

Linked contentDeprecated

Execution of shell code in Ruby scripts

Deprecated ways to execute shell code in Ruby

This is just a reference for legacy code. For new code, always use capture3.

%x{ } or backticks – quick and easy

Returns the standard output of running the given command in a subshell. This is an alias for `…`, and you can use string interpolation.

Example:

name = 'ls'
result = `which #{name}`

It does not escape anything you inject in the string.

If you want to find out if the call was …

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Recommended git workflow for feature branches

This is a guide on how to effectively use git when working on a feature branch. It is designed to get out of your way as much as possible while you work, and ensure you end up with clean commits in the end.

We assume you are the only person working on this branch. We also assume the branch has never been "partially" merged into master.

You want to start a feature branch

git checkout master
git checkout -b my-feature-branch
git push -u

You've added code that works independently of your other …

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Github Cheat Sheet

All the hidden and not hidden features of Git and GitHub.

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Git: Revert one or more commits

Reverting a commit means creating a new commit that undoes the old changes.

Imagine the following commit history:

* commit_sha3 [Story-ID 1] Fixup for my feature 
* commit_sha2 [Story-ID 5] Other feature
* commit_sha1 [Story-ID 1] My feature 

You can revert a single commit using the following syntax:

git revert commit_sha2

To revert changes that are split across multiple commits, use the --no-commit flag.

git revert --no-commit commit_sha3
git revert --no-commit commit_sha1
git commit -m "Revert Story 1"
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How to tackle complex refactorings in big projects

Sometimes huge refactorings or refactoring of core concepts of your application are necessary for being able to meet new requirements or to keep your application maintainable on the long run. Here are some thoughts about how to approach such challenges.

Break it down

Try to break your refactoring down in different parts. Try to make tests green for each part of your refactoring as soon as possible and only move to the next big part if your tests are fixed. It's not a good idea to work for weeks or months and wait for ALL puzzle pieces to…

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Make your Rails console (and irb) output better readable

Pour color on your Rails console with awesome_print. Turn confusing long strings into formatted output. Have objects and classes laid out clearly whenever you need it.

Put gem 'awesome_print', :group => :development into your Gemfile. Now on the Rails console you have the command ap that will give you a colored, formatted output of whatever you pass it. See the example output of the User class below.

For customization visit the repository on Github.

![awesome_print.png](https://makan…

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