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Drawing diagrams with draw.io

draw.io is a web application that lets you draw flow charts and other diagrams. It works much nicer than office suite tools like LibreOffice Draw.

Its UI is easy to use: Simply drag and drop shapes or arrows from the left-hand side onto your sheet. Drag start/end of arrows to shapes to automatically connect them. You can add text to shapes by selecting them and typing. To add colors, select a shape and use the right-hand panel.

While you can, you don't need to store your charts online. "Offline" storage can be files…

Repeats

Javascript: Calling a function with a variable number of arguments

This card describes how to pass an array with multiple element to a JavaScript function, so that the first array element becomes the first function argument, the second element becomes the second argument, etc.

Note how this is different from passing the entire array as the first argument. Compare these two different ways of calling fun() in Ruby:

# Ruby
array = [1, 2, 3]
fun(array)  # same as fun([1, 2, 3]) (1 argument)
fun(*array) # same as fun(1, 2, 3)   (3 arguments)

Depending on your culture the spreading of array e…

Repeats

Capybara: Find an element that contains a string

There is no CSS selector for matching elements that contains a given string ¹. Luckily, Capybara offers the :text option to go along with your selector:

page.find('div', text: 'Expected content')

You can also pass a regular expression!

page.find('div', text: /Expected contents?/i)

Note that if your CSS selector is as generic as div, you might get a lot more results than you expect. E.g. a <div class="container"> that surrounds your entire layout will probably also contain that text (in a descendant) and Capybara wil…

Pivotal Tracker now supports story description templates

When writing a story description in Pivotal Tracker, there is now a tiny button at the bottom of the description field where you can paste a template.

You can define your own templates by following "More" at the top, then "Templates".
We recommend you define a template following our suggested story description.

Note that the three default templates currently can not be removed or changed.

Minimal JavaScript function to detect version of Internet Explorer or Edge

If possible your code should detect features, not browsers. But sometimes you just need to sniff the browser. And when you do, you're probably fighting a Microsoft product.

The following function returns a Number like 10, 11, 12, 13 for Internet Explorer or Edge (anything above 11 is Edge). It returns undefined for any other browser.

```
function ieVersion(uaString) {
uaString = uaString || navigator.userAgent;
var match = /...

Repeats

Trigger native mouse events with Javascript

The attached Coffeescript helper will let you create mouse events:

$element = $('div')
Trigger.mouseover($element)
Trigger.mouseenter($element)
Trigger.mousedown($element)
Trigger.mouseup($element)
Trigger.mouseout($element)
Trigger.mouseleave($element)
Trigger.click($element)

The dispatched events are real DOM events, which will trigger both native and jQuery handlers.
jQuery's .trigger is simpler, but will only trigger event handlers that were bound by jQuery's .on.

Real user actions t…

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Debugging cucumber feature with javascript + firefox vnc

TL;DR Debugging problems with javascript errors in cucumber tests is sometimes easier in the browser. Run the test, stop at the problematic point (with Then pause from Spreewald 1.7+) and open VNC for Firefox.

Features:

Repeats

Raising JavaScript errors in Cucumber scenarios and how to silence them for particular scenarios

Raising JavaScript errors in Cucumber

With selenium JavaScript errors do not cause any failture in your cucumber scenarios. To archive a failture we can use the the Ruby bindings to Selenium Webdriver expose the Webdriver logging API introduced in version 2.38 .

The following step can be used:

```
Then /^there should be no JavaScript errors$/ do
if alert_present?
# Chrome 54 and/or Chromedriver 2.24 introduced a breaking change on how
# accessing browser logs work.
#
# Apparently, while an alert/confirm is open, Chro…

Repeats

CSS: Combining different length units with calc()

calc() lets you mix CSS units. Ever wanted to give an element "the container's width minus 20px on each side"? Here you go:

width: calc(100% - (20px * 2));

When using Sass, you need to interpolate Sass expressions:

width: calc(100% - #{$margin})

Supported by all modern browsers and IE9+.

Repeats

Do not use "flex: 1" or "flex-basis: 0" inside "flex-direction: column" when you need to support IE11

Flexbox is awesome. Most of it even works in IE11, but flex: 1 won't work reliably in Internet Explorer.
This it because implicitly sets flex-basis: 0 which IE fails to support properly.

Example

Consider the following HTML and CSS.

<div class="container">
  <div class="child">
    foo
  </div>
  <div class="bar">
    bar
  </div>
</div>
.container {
  display: flex;
  flex-direction: column;
}

.child {
  flex: 1;
}

See it in action at Plunker.

Background

Repeats

How to make changes to a Ruby gem (as a Rails developer)

At makandra, we've built a few gems over the years. Some of these are quite popular: spreewald (475k downloads), active_type (330k downloads), and geordi (210k downloads) for example (numbers from 2018).

Developing a Ruby gem is different from developing Rails applications, with the biggest difference: there is no Rails. This means:

  • no defined structure (neither for code nor directories)
  • no autoloading of classes, i.e. you need to require all files yourself
  • no [active_support](https://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActiveSupport.ht…

Chrome bug: Wrong stacking order when transitioning composited elements

Google Chrome has a subtle rendering bug that hits me once in a while. It usually occurs in sliders with HTML content.

The issue

When a slider contains a composited[1] element, the element will overlap any other element when sliding, being rendered as frontmost element. After the slider has settled, stacking order jumps back to normal.

It seems like Chrome is doing its compositing wrong. This doesn't happen in Firefox.

The cause

The issue only occurs if:

  • two elements A and B are nested inside an element C
  • A overlaps B (part…
Repeats

A quick introduction to CORS

Background

Cross-Site Request Forgery (CSRF) is an attack pattern for websites. A CSRF attack is usually relevant in a browser context, where state is kept for multiple domains (as opposed to independent requests made e.g. with curl). The most common example is authentication via cookies. If a script on https://example.com made requests to https://docs.google.com, the browser would send all cookies for docs.google.com along, effectively given the script access to anythin…

External contentRepeats

Getting permanent links to files on Github or Gitlab

Please don't simply copy line number links from Github. The URL usually contains a branch name like master:

https://github.com/makandra/upjs/blob/master/lib/assets/javascripts/up/link.js.coffee#L76

If someone now posts an insertion or deletion to that file into master your link points to the wrong line!

A better way is to (Github) press the Y key after clicking on a line number or (Gitlab) clicking the "Permalink" button in the top bar.

This will transform the URL to another URL that points to the particular commit:

```
h…

Repeats

HTML file inputs support picking directories

HTML's <input type="file"> accepts a single file. You can allow multiple files via <input type="file" multiple>.
But sometimes, selecting multiple files is not enough and can be cumbersome for the user. Enter webkitdirectory:

<input type="file" webkitdirectory multiple>

Using webkitdirectory switches the browser's file picker to select a directory. All files inside that directory, and inside any nested subdirectories, will be selected for the file input.

This can be useful when users want to upload all files from a nested dire…

External content

The Definitive Guide to Cookie Domains

Restricting access to cookies is essential for security in many web apps. For example, the session ID, the secret token used to identify a particular session, is typically stored in a cookie. Cookies have several important settings. Previously, I discussed the secure flag. This time, let’s dive into the cookie domain.

The cookie domain is an important security feature, probably even more important than the secure flag. It tells the browser that this cookie must only be sent to matching domains. Matching however, can happen in several w…

Repeats

HTML forms with multiple submit buttons

Most forms have a single submit button that will save the record when pressed.

Sometimes a form needs additional submit buttons like "accept" or "reject". Such buttons usually attempt a state transition while updating the record.

To process a form with multiple buttons, your server-side code will need to know which button was pressed. To do so you can give each submit button a different [formaction] attribute. This will override the …

Haml: Generating a unique selector for an element

Having a unique selector for an element is useful to later select it from JavaScript or to update a fragment with an Unpoly.

Haml lets you use square brackets ([]) to generate a unique class name and ID from a given Ruby object. Haml will infer a class attribute from the given object's Ruby class. It will also infer an id attribute from the given object's Ruby class and #id method.

This is especially useful with ActiveRecord instances, which have a persisted #id and will hence **generate the same selector o…

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